Crayola Colored Pencils Review

12 Dec

Product Description

Everybody knows Crayola.  For generations, their crayons were a staple of the American childhood experience.  We looked at the history of Crayola as an American company in our review of their highly rated washable finger paints.  With over 100 years of making crayons, Crayola diversified into colored pencils in 1988.

Crayola offers a description of their manufacturing process on their website in a detailed post.   The process starts with trees grown in sustainably managed forests in Brazil and Costa Rica.  These forests are not owned by Crayola, but they are monitored by the company to ensure they are not using rain forest wood.  The lumber is cut into slats, and grooves are machined into these slats.  The colored pencil cores, or ‘lead’, are subsequently sandwiched between two of these slats.  The entire stack is glued together and allowed to dry before being painted the color of the core.

American Alternative Review

All the wood for Crayola colored pencils are grown in Costa Rica or Brazil, and manufacturing happens in those countries as well.  The colored pencils get points from us for Crayola being an American company.  Also, all the colored pencil packaging is made at the Crayola facility in Pennsylvania and then shipped to the manufacturers in Brazil and Costa Rica for pack-out.  Unfortunately, packaging is a very small component of the final product and does not give the score a large boost.

1.5/5 stars

You can check out the Crayola 50-pack of colored pencils here and the 64-pack here.  But we recommend you consider the highly American-Alternative-rated General Pencil Colored Pencils.

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